Strife - Rush (1975, UK fantastic hard/progressive rock; Chrysalis label, vinyl rip) Flac


Hard/heavy rock da melhor qualidade; um de meus álbuns preferidos. Desfrutem!


British power trio Strife debuted with 1975's Rush, a quirky, progressive-tinged hard rocker that could draw some stoned comparisons to early Budgie and Hawkwind.

The record's big highlight is kick ass opener "Back Streets of Heaven", a hard charging catchy stomper in the Sweet vein. Much of the rest is jammy, but there's enough interesting moments throughout to warrant a spin every now and then.

When listening to this debut, Uriah Heep comes to mind, but I must say that Strife has a quite original sound.

John Reid is using a soft vocal style even though the music is sometimes heavy. His vibrato sound like Bryan Ferry's.
Most of the tracks are really good and I recommend this to those who like 70's heavy rock. Indian Dream is the stand-out track the rest is O.K. Probably hard to find these days but Metal fans might find it interesting.

A crossover between MC5 and The Sweet. Brilliant!






Comentários

  1. LINK:

    Flac (vinyl rip) +scans

    https://mega.co.nz/#!pQ9lAA4B!8PhXcl1zvCwaiAHsRDydiVyk1_qE5_d0ZZ5Gi1GAbAI

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  2. Although it was the beginning of 1975, it was a very successful album,the original pressing of 'Rush' (Chrysalis CHR 1063)directly referring to the classics of the genre. The best track on the album is closes album, title track ''Written'' a great, 12-minute heavy-progressive killer! British power trio Strife debuted with 1975's Rush, a quirky, progressive-tinged hard rocker that could draw some stoned comparisons to early Budgie and Hawkwind. The record's big highlight is kick ass opener "Back Streets of Heaven", a hard charging catchy stomper in the Sweet vein, as well as "Indian Dream" which boasts an atmospheric opening and a neat guitar solo. When listening to this debut, Uriah Heep comes to mind, but I must say that Strife has a quite original sound. John Reid is using a soft vocal style even though the music is sometimes heavy. His vibrato sound like Bryan Ferry's. Most of the tracks are really good and I recommend this to those who like 70's heavy rock. Probably hard to find these days but Metal fans might find it interesting.

    Let me tell you a story.....
    Once upon a time in the 1970's there was a band called "STRIFE". They played high-energy rock - and they played it very well. Wherever they played, the audiences loved them. You would think that they were bound to make it big - travel the world - sell millions of records - make their fortune and live happily ever after. You would think...... From the start, they were unfashionable - they came from Merseyside at a time when even the Beatles didn't go there. They did not have a trendy manager - they didn't have a manager at all! They could not get a record deal in London. They had to travel to LA. to get a record deal - and then it was with Chrysalis Records who were based in London! The first album "Rush" went into the top 10 of the Virgin LP charts just as they finished a tour supporting "Baker Gurvitz Army".

    Strife were Recorded at, Morgan Studio
    Please note that after almost 40 years, people may remember things differently - Strife were formed by Paul Ellson in 1969 with Peter Trotman on guitar, Peter Hobbs on bass , and Ellson on drums. Within a few gigs, Gordon Rowley had replaced Hobbs on bass and also became chief vocalist. Around that time, Graham Kin also joined on keyboards and vocals, leaving within a year to return to studies.

    Soon (1971), the band were joined by John Reid, ex The Klubbs, on guitar and vocals. They recorded a demo - 'Preparation' c/w 'Jerafter' as a four peice but soon after, Peter Trotman left the band and they were joined by singer Paddy Breen also ex The Klubbs. Breen's sojourn, however, was short-lived.
    In '72, John Reid was badly injured whilst Stock Car racing. Peter Trotman stepped in temporarily but, at a Liverpool Club, Gordon Rowley was electrocuted and almost died on stage, being resuscitated by medics from the stunned audience.
    Back together again, the 3 piece record "Magic of the Dawn" a demo recording organised by soul singer Edwin Starr who had seen the band at the Mardi Gras club in Liverpool. (Whist gigging nationally, Strife also often played local, Merseyside venues, sometimes playing Liverpool's Cavern Club, two or even three nights in a week.)

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  3. In 1973 Strife went to Los Angeles, they had an invitation to contact Mal Evans, Apple executive and former Beatles road manager. They had met Mal on a film set, 'Little Malcolm'. Although their act was considered too wild and attention-grabbing for the film's club scenes (some audience members spontaneously jumped on the tables, thus spoiling the shots) it's possible that the band may be seen as extras (has anyone out there checked?). Mal Evans was working in L.A. with John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. However, the media frenzy at this get-together was so intense that, a few hours prior to the arranged meeting, the ex-Beatles and their entourage had left the city for a secret destination where they could continue their work in peace. No-one, including Strife, were told of the departure or the destination.

    As the band walked away from the abandoned meeting place, a pink Cadillac did a U-turn and pulled alongside. It was Edwin Starr. Through Starr they soon met up with R.Dean Taylor and recorded a demo album, both in L.A. and in San Francisco, with Taylor as producer. One of these songs, 'Better Man than I' turned up on the album 'Rush'. These sessions also resulted in the acetate 'Worry', believed to be now owned by renown Liverpool DJ, Billy Butler. Whist on a second trip to the US that year, Strife were offered a deal by the William Morris Agency to replace Grand Funk Railroad on their roster. For some reason, the band were unimpressed and returned to the UK to tour; gigs included the last night of the original Cavern Club.

    Strife signed with Chrysalis Records in the UK in '74 and recorded 'Rush'. It was released in early '75 with a strong appearance in the Virgin chart (at the time, the main barometer of UK rock music). As the album was released, Strife toured with Ginger Baker led outfit, The Baker Gurvitz Army. Shortly after this tour, they were joined by guitarist Vic Pappaleo but, despite Vic being an amazing guitarist, the format didn't work out. Strife continued as a three piece, working solidly and increasing their fan-base. However, despite the band's popularity, Chrysalis, whilst going through a corporate identity crisis, refused to release any further material - They were getting a reputation in the music business as a band you did NOT want as a support band - they were likely to blow the headlining band clean off the stage. One big push from their record company and they would be there! Chrysalis were having great success with Leo Sayer etc. and less success with their Rock acts, and were considering repositioning themselves as a more MOR label. Without a manager to fight for them, STRIFE were put on hold. Chrysalis would not release any further recordings, but would not release "STRIFE" from their three-year contract. They were trapped. During this mid-70s period the gigging figures showed that Strife were the most in-demand rock band in Britain. No band was safe from being blown offstage. Procol Harum paid Strife off, Judas Priest pulled out, The Average White Band turned plain nasty and Slade's manager, Chas. Chandler, gave instructions that his band should never have to appear with Strife again. Moving from support, from '73 onwards, the band headlined in major venues as well as famous rock clubs such as the London's Marquee and Frankfurt's Zoom.

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  4. They gigged more than ever, and continued to go down well. The situation was frustrating, but they were still much in demand, and the contract would soon run out. Regardless of the legal situation, Strife were determined to keep recording and in 1977 recorded the EP 'School', releasing it on their own label, Outlaw. (Their agent, Paul King was later to take the name 'Outlaw' for his highly successful concert promotions company). After Strife eased out of the Chrysalis contract, 'School' was quickly picked up and released by EMI .

    On New Year's Eve 1977, Paul Ellson left the band to be replaced by David Williams, his former drum roadie. With Williams in the driving seat, the album 'Back to Thunder' was recorded and released on the Gull label. By now though, Punk dominated the scene and, within a year or so, following an illness' of Gordon Rowley, the band split.

    "Back To Thunder" was their the 2nd and last album originally released on "Gull Records" in 1978, for me is,very good dreamlike,though a late period 1978, features the bass solo track "Red Sun" from Gordon Rowley who was once voted the 2nd best Bass player in the world.

    Absolutely guitar-driven, a classic anyway in my humble opinion ! I’ll try to explain why.
    A rasping, scratchy guitar starts “Shockproof” with a fast repeating riff which makes your boogie feet itch. John Reid is the man behind all the guitars on the album and, believe me, he’s busy here! And he takes care of all the lead vocals as well. He got a very pleasant voice, light and smooth but with the necessary power needed to cope with the music. A busy man is also the drummer David Williams, he pounds along with Gordon Rowley’s and keeping the track tight and meaty. A few bars with fat boogie is thrown in for good measure before John Reid lays on more guitars on top of the raspy riff who runs all the way through the track. I liked this track immediately, but when I heard the follower, “Let Me Down”, I was completely sold! Some fragile soft chords from John’s guitar starts the ball before a fat, bluesy guitar tops the easy riff in the background. And the bass of Gordon is far more at present here, heavy and slightly distorted. It’s powerful and full of hooks that sticks to your brain. A killer ! Much of the same is to said about “Feel So Good”, a short fast snappy tune, but with a tough wah-wah solo, which was very typical seventies. Goodie!

    Don Airey is no novice when it comes to the art of keyboard playing (widely known for his work with Colosseum II, Rainbow and many others), and he’s the man hired to deal with the job on this album. We got a good feel of the man’s capabilities in “Sky” where he backs the band nicely with piano and has clever ideas when it comes to follow all John Reid’s guitars and tempo changes. Maybe the best track on the album !!
    “You Are What You Are” is another track with several tempo changes, lots of guitars but where Gordon’s bass steals the show with his bending of the strings and where Don adds a few Hammond organ chords. Gordon has also written the follower, “Red Sun”, an instrumental with only his bass guitar as the only instrument. The track got this warm sound despite the fact that the bass is heavily fuzzed at times. The long “Fool Injected Overlap” opens with some nice acoustic guitar theme and some relaxed singing before both the power and tempo changes. And more tempo changes is to come, this one is a workout of dimensions for the whole band. Good one! Good is also the album closer “Weary Traveller”, a more quiet and subdued track with John’s voice full of soul and where Don’s keyboards is majestic and classical inspired. An absolutely worthy ending to a classy album!
    Strife, and particularly on this album, was a band who knew a lot how to sound both heavy and simple, advanced and rocking!

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  5. So if you’re into records with tons of guitars, rocking and heavy, coupled up with shitloads of tempo changes and good songs, you could do a lot worse than get your hands on this one. Strife released only two albums (this was their second and last) and one EP in their short career. Their debut “Rush” isn’t quite up to the standard of this one. All I know is that when they called it a day, bass player Gordon Rowley started Nightwing.

    Thanks Nel!! :)

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  6. thank you very much!
    many thanks for info. adamus67

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  7. Rogério M. Schirach19 de setembro de 2014 01:10

    Falaram que eu não podia mais entrar nesta porra de bordel, porque não paguei a "véia" numa "tentativa" (de que?) mas eu sou descarado, então to aqui p/comentar sobre esta banda "Strife"....Uma das melhores que curtí, muito bom! Não baixei daqui, mas preciso deixar um comentário, pelo menos.
    Abraços a todos
    MrRocker

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  8. Link is dead. Could you please provide new one?

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    Respostas
    1. New link:

      https://cloud.mail.ru/public/359f46c66eba/Strife%20-%20Rush%20(1975)%20WavPack.rar

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